About bob moricz

Lo fi no budget cinema art fuck cognitive dissonance in three acts or less since 1983.

They Destroy Them After I Shoot There

THEN

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NOW

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I have this strange thing that follows me around wherever I go. I find a great shooting location, then I shoot there, and then people come along and tear it down or build something in its place.

There was a cool vacant lot in my neighborhood where I shot a quick scene for my latest opus KRIMI. Top is what it looks like in the movie. Bottom is what’s going on today. Hope it’s not condos! Blech!

The Soil, The Earth, Water, And Air

Having a kid has vastly altered my time space continuum but I did make it out to see Jodorowsky’s Dune. The big takeaway was, shoot high and if you fail don’t let it bug you. My dream is to turn people on to no-fi filmmaking. This has already happened in music via amazing no tech recordings by The Breeders, Guided By Voices, R.L. Burnside, John Fahey, and Pussy Galore, among many others. I want to do this via the moving picture medium. So far, it’s not really happening. Most seem to be stuck in the same locale Hollywood has already put them in. But I don’t care. Going to keep doing what I do and preaching the gospel whether or not anybody listens. I can plant the seeds but the roots are gonna grow depending on the soil, the earth, water, and air.

Slap Dash For No Cash

Those are the movies I like! I don’t buy that money is the root of all evil, just as I don’t buy the idea that one needs lots of money to wear cool clothes, make great movies, or to live a meaningful and fulfilling life. The global economic culture is a ferociously voracious game. It’s dumb to play by those rules.

Those who control the money motions of the world cynically use art as a tool for selling things to people. It is a sad thing when something which can enlighten is short shifted and abused for the lowest common denominator. That’s like killing someone with a hammer.

Once bankable big name directors must resort to crowd funding to get their projects off the ground because producers with big cash caches won’t give them money. If it can’t compete with the new zillion dollar super peep du jour flick, it’s not going to get funded.

Some low budget indie auteurs complain that when big name die rectors use crowd funding, they are taking money away from the underdog. But why does the underdog need money to make a great movie? I got my Fisher Price camera for less than thirty bucks. And it looks way better than the overhyped and overpriced digital Bolex in my humble opinion. And the files are .avi files, files for the people.

What matters is what happens in front of the camera. Use your friends for actors. They are free. Go to the cool locations in your neighborhood, shoot fast and get the heck out of there. Make a killer set out of stuff from the Rebuilding Center in your own backyard. The options are limitless. If Hollywood can make a lousy stinker for zillions of dollars, then you can make a striking work of art for no money whatsoever. Shut up and go do it. Prove the sacks of cash wrong.

 

Another EFFing Great Fest

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l-r Kenny Reed, Mike Brady, Deron Williams, Bob Moricz, photo Irina Beffa

In an article Hannah Piper Burns, co-founder of Experimental Film Festival Portland, compares it to summer camp. Last year I met and became fans of some amazing motion picture artists. When the festival was over I felt inspired and not so alone in my mad science lab doing my darnedest to make the world a better place through moving images.

Irina, the kid, and I went to a phenomenal screening yesterday at the Clinton Street Theater where I got a chance to chew the fat with a few of the filmmakers I met and became fans of last year. Again, feeling refreshed and inspired.

Good Belonging Nowhere

Irina and I were talking about this. We are both third culture kids. Meaning our folks are immigrants, but we grew up in America as children in between cultures, not quite American and not quite Eastern European. This means we don’t fit in anywhere. We learned that early and it wasn’t easy. We got made fun of a lot. Had no idea why at the time, but now it makes sense.

There’s something within the human composition demanding us to find a group with which we identify, then subsume ourselves to their standards, ideals, and norms. The individual gives themselves over to the group. It’s sort of nice not belonging anywhere. You get to do your own thing, not swayed by the scrutiny of others. What comes is a pure expression, not one shaped by a committee of peers. It’s good to be critical of one’s surroundings and to trust in the things one is compelled to create.

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